BRIDGES OUT OF POVERTY

BRIDGES OUT OF POVERTY WORKSHOPS

Bridges Out of Poverty workshops are presented in partnership with United Way of Greater Stark County and approved for CEU’s for social workers.


13.3% of the population for whom poverty status is determined in Stark County, OH (364,905 people) live below the poverty line, living paycheck to paycheck with no clear path to a more stable future.

GET INVOLVED. United Way of Greater Stark County’s Bridges Out of Poverty workshop helps organizations understand the causes of poverty, the hidden rules of each economic class, mental models of economic class, language barriers, family structure and more.
United Way of Greater Stark County is creating a path to financial stability and independence for our neighbors and if we work together, we can eliminate poverty in our communities.

BRIDGES OUT OF POVERTY is a framework for understanding poverty. It is about appreciating economic diversity. If we can just shift our thinking about economics, then we have the power to shape our reality. Having or not having doesn’t change your thinking.


OVERVIEW: Bridges supplies the tools, training, understanding, access and guidance to help people better understand generational poverty - the first step to eliminating poverty in our community. Bridges Out of Poverty trains your staff to break barriers between the economic classes. The training can be used at all levels: individual, institutional, community and policy. Bridges gives you specific tools to detect patterns.

BRIDGES OUT OF POVERTY FACILITATORS: Kimberly Douce, LSW; Robin Seemann, AFC; Cassie Ausperk


CONTACT US FOR MORE INFORMATION:

KIMBERLY DOUCE | United Way of Greater Stark County | Vice President Community Impact | 330-491-9985 | kimberly.douce@uwstark.org

ROBIN SEEMANN | United Way of Greater Stark County | Director of Income Impact Council | 330-491-9983 | robin.seemann@uwstark.org

CASSIE AUSPERK | United Way of Greater Stark County | Director of Health Impact Council | 330-491-9962 | cassie.ausperk@uwstark.org
 


UPCOMING TRAININGS


BRIDGES OUT OF POVERTY WORKSHOP

MODULE 1: MENTAL MODELS OF ECONOMIC CLASS
Explore the concrete experience of people in generational poverty and create mental models of poverty, the middle class and wealth. Take a look at the interlocking nature of the models and the demands of the environment.

MODULE 2: RESEARCH CONTINUUM
Understand the causes of poverty in order to build resources and find out what is needed to build a sustainable community.

MODULE 3: KEY POINTS & BRIDGES CONSTRUCTS
Establish key concepts underlying the BRIDGES OUT OF POVERTY framework.

MODULE 4: HIDDEN RULES
Each class has a set of hidden rules designed to let you know that you don’t belong. Learn the hidden rules and be comfortable engaging in all three economic class environments. Spot them in your interactions and moving forward, you will be able to respond differently.

MODULE 5: LANGUAGES
There are 5 different language registers used by each economic class: static, formal, consultative, casual and intimate. Each register has an appropriate use determined by the audience, topic, purpose and location. Module 5 also deals with nonverbal communication, your messaging, how you are being received and how to become “bilingual”.

MODULE 6: RESOURCES
To better understand people from poverty, the definition of poverty will be the “extent to which an individual does without resources.” Explore the 8 resources and ways to nuture and build them.

MODULE 7: NOW WHAT? TOOLS
Explore and practice voice and mediation techniques as tools for front-line staff members.


RUBY K. PAYNE -  BRIDGES OUT OF POVERTY
“The nearly uniform advantages received by the children of the college-educated professionals suggest the evolution of an increasingly distinct subculture in American society, one in which adults routinely transmit to their offspring the symbolic thinking and confident problem solving that mark the adults’ economic activities and that are so difficult for outsiders to acquire in mid-life. A trend toward separation into subcultures jeopardizes the upward mobility that has given this nation greatness and presages the tragedy of downward mobility that produces increasing numbers of working poor. If this trend is to be reversed, a beginning must be made now. The issue is no longer one of eradicating poverty or of putting welfare recipients to work but of reversing a trend, the downward drift of the working class.”